Author Topic: Charging vs. Blocking?  (Read 374 times)

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pdcarpenter

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Charging vs. Blocking?
« on: January 13, 2017, 10:53:12 pm »
Could I please have an official explain the difference between an offensive charging foul and a defensive blocking foul in these two scenarios:

1) Defensive player has established position, both feet planted, does not move.  Offensive player receives a pass and dribbles straight into his chest.  Ref called it a blocking foul and explained that you have to give the defensive player at least two steps for it to be a charge.  I can't find any reference to two steps and the only thing I can find reads that if the defensive player has established a legal defensive position, the call should be a charge.

2) Defensive player has established position, both feet planted and does not move an inch.  An offensive player jumps in the air after the defensive player has established position to receive a pass.  He lands with possession of the ball right in front of the defender and as he turns, he turns right into the chest of the defender.  Ref again called it a blocking foul and said that the defender not only has to give the player space to come down but he also has to give space for the player to turn.  The only way this could happen would be if the defender gives up his space that he's already established in a legal defensive position.  He clearly established his position before the offensive player went in the air for the pass, the offensive player came down on the floor avoiding contact, and only made contact with the defender when he turned to go to the basket.  I can't find where the defender is then required to give up his legal, established defensive position.  In my opinion, this should have also been called a charge.

Thanks in advance for your replies.

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Director of Officials

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Re: Charging vs. Blocking?
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2017, 11:45:41 am »
Sorry for the delay in seeing this.  See the definition below on your instances of a block vs charge.

If you have a video, I would love to take a look at this? 

Rule 4, Section 23 is specifically for the situations you stated above.

Art 2 - to obtain an initial legal guarding position: a.) The guard must have both feet touching the playing court (inbounds) b.) The front of the guard's torso must be facing the opponent. 

Art 3  After initial legal guarding positions is obtained: a.) the guard may have one or both feet on the playing court or be airborne, provided he/she has inbound status.  b.) the guard is not required to continue facing the opponent.  c.) The guard may move laterally or obliquely to maintain position, provided it is not toward the opponent when contact occurs.  d.) the guard may raise hand or jump within his/her own vertical plane, e.) the guard may turn or duck to absorb the shock of imminent contact. 

Art 4 - Guarding an opponent with the ball or a stationary opponent with the ball:  a.) no time or distance is required to obtain an initial legal position b.) if the opponent with the ball is airborne, the guard must have obtained legal guarding position before the opponent left the floor. 

Art 5 - Guarding a moving opponent without the ball:  a.) Time and distance are factors required to obtain an initial legal position b.) The guard must give the opponent the time and/or distance to avoid contact.  c.) The distance need not be more than two strides. d.) if the opponent is airborne, the guard must have obtained legal position before the opponent left the floor. 

In example #1 by you - If the offensive player received the pass and then had time to dribble (2 strides) then it should have been an offensive foul (assuming he did obtain legal guarding position first) 
This one would just depend on when the offensive player received the ball and if he then got in two strides. 

In example #2 by you - if the defensive player had established legal guarding position before the player was airborne then you would have a charge, but it sounds like the player came back down without crashing into the defender?  There is no rule about having to give a player space to Turn so I am not sure where that came from.

Video is a great way for me to give you a definite answer and to show the officials for review. 
I have a hudl account or if they are short clips you can just email them to me?  bkelleyok@gmail.com
Dropbox would be another way you could send me a link? 

Regards,
Bobby Kelley
Director of INBC Officials
918-607-2055 cell


pdcarpenter

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Re: Charging vs. Blocking?
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2017, 11:24:31 am »
Unfortunately I don't have video.  I understand that these are probably some of the hardest calls to make and I felt like my player was set both times.  The main issue I had was I couldn't find a reference to the two strides or space to turn explanations that I was given when the refs seemed to concede that he was set.  Thanks for the reply.